Archives for posts with tag: New York Times

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Friday night I saw the the film The Lunchbox, a love story of sorts centered around Mumbai’s incredibly efficient lunchbox delivery system. If you watch this movie hungry your stomach will be grumbling throughout, craving the mouth-watering curries that the lucky character Saajan gets to eat each day for lunch. It also made me want to remake my red lentil tarkaspicy coconut curry, and quick curry.

But this post takes a different tack. Inspired by the craze of cross-pollinating baked goods all over this town I read Julia Moskin’s story in this week’s Times with interest. I can’t really say or write “scuffin” without smirking (cronut is easier for some reason), so I’m not calling these that. These are basically muffins filled with jam. I didn’t include the cream from the original recipe although I’m sure that would be tasty (I just rarely have cream on hand and it didn’t seem totally necessary here). I also added whole grain rye flour instead of using all-purpose pastry flour, making for a richer, slightly denser flavor that I like, kinda the philosophy of Tartine’s Book No. 3, on baking with whole grains.

If you’re avoiding butter and eggs (I’m looking at you my vegan friends) you could substitute coconut oil for the butter, and half a mashed banana for the egg. Check out this post for a few different vegan egg replacements for baking. And if you use the coconut oil instead of butter, use 1/4 c additional coconut oil instead of the olive oil that’s called for below, that will just keep for a more consistent flavor.

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Whole Grain Muffins with Jam
adapted from Julia Moskin, The New York Times

4 tbsp unsalted butter, plus more for greasing muffin tins
1 c whole-wheat flour
3/4 c rye flour (you can use all-purpose or any other type you like)
1/4 c wheat germ
3 tbsp raw sugar
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 c whole milk
1/4 c olive oil
approx. 1/2 c of your favorite fruit jam

Preheat your oven to 350F. Grease 12 muffin cups with butter and set aside. Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl. Melt the butter and add to the dry ingredients, mixing with a fork until just combined.

In a separate bowl whisk together the egg (or 1/2 banana if using), milk, and olive oil, and add to the dry ingredients until just combined.

Scoop the dough into the muffin tins, reserving about 1/4 of the dough for topping. Make a small well in the dough and drop in a spoonful of your favorite fruit jam. Using the remaining dough cover the tops of the muffins, across the top you can scatter a little sugar, or flax seeds, or poppy seeds, crushed nuts might be good too.

Bake 20 to 25 minutes until browned. Let cool then, using a butter knife, transfer out of the tins to a rack.

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Yields 12 muffins

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Happy holidays and happy new year folks!

This post came into being in a very round about way. I was reading the New York Times article on baking whole grain holiday cookies, recipes courtesy of Chad Robertson of Tartine Bakery in San Francisco. What a smart idea. I’ve been doing this already, and wanting to do it more, and am so glad someone’s already gone and made a whole cookbook on baking with whole grains. And not in some preachy, eat-more-whole-grains-they’re-good-for-you way, but because, as Chad says, they just taste more complex and interesting. So right Chad.

For instance you could make these thumbprint cookies with toasted nuts and whole grains, using dark rye flour. Check out Chad’s Tartine Book No. 3 which is chock-a-block with similar recipes.

Anyway this led me to reading about Tartine’s earlier cookbook, Tartine Bread, and a recipe for Whole Grain Seeded Bread. This was last night. It was late. I’m in holiday vacation mode, game for baking. I very quickly scanned the recipe I found online and thought, great, I’ll get the dough started tonight, head to bed, and bake it in the morning! Unfortunately at every turn in the recipe I realized it was more involved, more complex, than I’d been prepared for. (And I didn’t have all the ingredients on hand.) But there was no going back, I’d already mixed a large quantity of flour and water and besides, I love a good challenge.

This recipe uses a pre-ferment: a mixture of flour, water, and yeast that sits overnight to develop a flavor in the bread that is more, well, complex and tasty. The pre-ferment is later added to the rest of the dough the following day. This recipe also calls for baking the bread at a high temperature (475 degrees) and in a covered dutch oven the first 20 minutes, and uncovered for the last 20 minutes. The recipe below is my very adapted version of the original from Tartine, accounting for which ingredients I had on hand (whole wheat flour but not whole grain wheat flour; sesame seeds but not flax or poppy), and my slight lack in patience (original recipe would take a total of at least two days from start to finish). And you know what? The bread turned out real good. With a tang like the San Francisco style sourdough loaves. And only 12 hours from start to finish (including sleep time), so get baking!

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Whole Grain Seeded Bread
Adapted from Chad Robertson
[Measurements are rough, not precise; recipe was given in metric so I tried to convert as best I could, and reduce the recipe—the original of which would’ve produced more like 3 loaves, whereas this produces 1 large-ish loaf]

For the pre-ferment
1 1/2 c whole wheat flour
1 1/2 c all-purpose flour
3/4 c warm water (approx. 70 deg. F)
1 gram active dry yeast (about 1/3 tsp)

Prepare this pre-ferment the night before you will mix your dough and bake. Mix the flour, water, and yeast in a non-reactive bowl (I use glass). Let stand at room temperature overnight for 10–12 hours. If you are not ready to mix your dough after this period, put the pre-ferment in the fridge, covered, and use within 8 hours.

For the dough
1/4 c seed mixture (flax, poppy, and toasted sesame)
3 c whole wheat flour (or, next time, I’m going to try whole rye flour)
1 1/2 c warm water, plus additional when mixing
2 tsp salt

At least one hour prior to mixing the dough, soak the seed mixture with a small amount of hot water, then let cool to room temperature. (Remember to toast your sesame seeds prior to this—I used a small skillet on the stovetop to do this.)

To mix the dough, add the water to a large bowl. Add the pre-ferment and stir to disperse. Add the flour. Using your hands, mix throughly, firmly, until no bits of dry flour remain. At this point you may need to add either more flour or more water. (I o.d.’ed on the water so ended up having to gradually add more flour.) If you’re used to making bread you’ll know when you have the right consistency, and right ratio of water to flour. It should be dry enough that it doesn’t really stick to your hands, and should be pliable, and able to form into a round or the shape of your choice. Let the dough rest in the bowl for 20 to 40 minutes.

After the rest, add the salt and seed mixture and incorporate into the dough. Continue to fold the dough on top of itself to develop the dough and dissolve the salt. Ideally you would let the dough rise at this point, at moderately warm room temperature, for about 3–4 hours. I let it sit about 20 minutes then baked it.

Preheat your oven to 500 deg. F, along with the heavy dutch oven and tight-fitting lid. I shaped my loaf not quite into a round but more of an oval, since the Le Creuset I have is not a dutch oven but more of a casserole. Place the loaf into the dutch oven, seal completely, and immediately turn the oven temperature down to 475 deg. Bake for 20 minutes with the lid on, then after 20 minutes, remove the lid and continuing baking another 20 minutes or until deep golden brown.

Cool the bread on a wire rack. Serve plain and simple with butter and salt. Or Earth Balance. Or Olive Oil.

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Pics below from the past week: strolling down 5th Avenue two days before Christmas, glimpse of the tree at Rockefeller Center; my favorite work in the American Modern: Hopper to O’Keeffe exhibition at MoMA, this is Alfred Stieglitz’s Georgia O’Keeffee – Hands and Horse Skull from 1931; and me below with my lovable nephew Nate.

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Do you know what a tarte tatin is? You may have eaten one without realizing what it was. It’s essentially fruit that’s caramelized in butter and sugar, baked with pastry on top, and then flipped over and served upside down with the fruit showing.

I was up in Woodstock this week and came upon this slide show in the Times for tomato recipes—garlicky tomato gazpacho, Sicilian stuffed tomatoes, and so on—but the one that really caught my eye was the tarte tatin, made with a variety of cherry tomatoes, chopped olives, and thyme. I vowed to make it as soon as I returned to the city this weekend. And so I did.

This being high tomato season and all, I can’t help myself when I’m at the coop or the farmer’s market and I walk by those little green pint baskets filled with Sun Golds or Elettros, Brown Berries, and Red Pear Heirlooms. They are, after all, only good this time of year—one month, maybe two if I’m lucky, so I get them while the getting’s good.

The Times recipe was pretty good but I added red chile pepper flakes for some heat (which I add to almost everything—ice cream?), and halved the cherry tomatoes because some of mine were quite large. Do not make this mistake—don’t halve your cherry tomatoes! They end up leaking a lot of their liquid into the tart and the pastry became a little soggy. Live and learn. It still tastes scrumptious.

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Caramelized Tomato Tart Tatin
Yields 4 to 6 servings

1 14-ounce package of puff pastry
2 tbsp unsalted butter
3 red onions, thinly sliced
1/4 cup plus a pinch of sugar
1/2 teaspoon sherry or white vinegar
1/4 cup chopped pitted Kalamata olives
1 1/2 pints (about 1 pound) cherry or grape tomatoes
1 tbsp chopped fresh thyme
Salt and pepper, to taste

1. If frozen, slightly thaw your puff pastry, about 20 minutes before you will handle it. The colder it is the easier it is to work with but it shouldn’t be frozen. Gently unfold the pastry and cut into an approx. 10-inch circle. Set aside in the refrigerator. Preheat the oven to 425 F.

2. Melt butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and a pinch of sugar and cook, stirring, until onions are golden and caramelized, about 15 to 20 minutes. Add 2 tbsp water to deglaze the pan, scraping brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Turn off the heat and set aside.

3. In a separate, ovenproof 9-inch skillet (I used a cast-iron), combine 1/4 cup sugar and 3 tbsp water. Cook over medium heat, swirling the pan gently (don’t stir) until the sugar melts and turns amber, 5 to 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and swirl gently.

4. Sprinkle olives over caramel. Scatter tomatoes over olives, then the onions. Season with the thyme, salt, and pepper. Top with the puff pastry round, tucking the edges into the sides of the skillet. Cut several long vents into the top of the pastry.

5. Bake tart until crust is puffed and golden, 25 to 30 minutes. Let stand for 5 minutes, then loosen the edges with a butter knife. Carefully flip the tart out onto a serving dish. Cut into wedges and serve.

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